There's no denying that a massive population all over the world relies on the black magic that is coffee to commence their daily lives. Some have one cup in the morning and other drink steadily throughout the day. Are you a coffee drinker who has ever wondered if there's something more in the coffee world? Well, the answer is a resounding, yes! Cold-brew coffee has all of the fantastic benefits of coffee without the downside of unpleasant bitterness.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces whole coffee beans
  • 4 cups water

Directions

  1. Carefully measure 4 ounces of whole coffee beans using a digital food scale.

  2. Pour the coffee beans into a coffee grinder. Grind the beans into a coarse-like texture. If you grind the coffee beans too fine, it can result in over-steeping.

  3. Add the ground beans to your French press or fine mesh bag.

  4. Fill the French press with 4 cups of water. Place the lid on the French press and press down slightly to make room if needed. If you're not using a French press, place the nylon bag in a wide mouth vessel which can hold the beans and water.

  5. Place your container in the fridge. Steep for 18-24 hours.

  6. Gently press the beans as you would press a regular pot of French pressed coffee. If you're not using a French press, remove the nylon bag of ground beans, allowing the bag drip back into the container. Discard.

  7. Enjoy your cold brew coffee concentrate!

Supplies

  • digital food scale, grams and ounces
  • coffee grinder
  • French press or fine mesh nylon bag
  • wide mouth vessel (if not using French press)

What Is Cold-Brew Coffee Concentrate?

cold brew coffee concentrate

Cold-brew concentrate is more potent than regular cold brew coffee or hot-brewed coffee. Concentrated cold-brew is more versatile as you can turn it into a regular glass of cold-brew coffee or make incredible caffeinated creations such as cold brew lattes.

One of the most attractive benefits of cold brewed coffee or its concentrate is how smooth it is compared to hot-brewed coffee. Heat in coffee brewing allows you to extract flavor and caffeine from the bean quicker. However, the bitterness is also created. Some find cold-brew so smooth and delicious they need no milk and sugar at all to enjoy it. Here are a few ideas to help illustrate how useful cold-brew coffee concentrate can be.

Cold-Brew Coffee Concentrate Creations

cold brew drinks
Brittany Baxter

Make A Regular Glass Of Cold-Brew

To turn your cold-brew coffee concentrate into a regular glass of cold-brew, all you need to do is use one part concentrate and one part water. From there you can dress the coffee with cream and sugar to your tastes.

Make A Cup Of Hot Coffee

If you'd like all the smooth benefits of cold-brew but prefer to have your coffee hot in the morning, you can do so by adding one part boiling water to one part cold-brew concentrate and be on your way.

Cold Brew Lattes

With the cold-brew in a concentrated state, it's much easier to imitate espresso-based beverages such as lattes. To make a hot cold-brew late, combine one part cold-brew concentrate, two parts milk, and one to two pumps of your favorite coffee flavoring syrup. Heat it up in the microwave until hot. Of course, a cold-brew coffee latte is just as magical. Here's how you can create a stunning cold-brew concentrate caramel macchiato:

Line a glass with one to three tablespoons of caramel sauce. Then fill the glass with one cup of milk and one tablespoon of vanilla coffee syrup. Finally, top the latte off with 1/3 of a cup of cold-brew coffee concentrate. Pour it in gently to create the macchiato layering effect.

With the power of cold-brew concentrate at your fingertips, the number of tasty coffee concoctions you can produce is limited only by your imagination. Happy cold brewing!

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