There are so many types of bread, it's beautiful. I love bread. I love bread so much it hurts. Eating too much bread also hurts. But did you know there is HEALTHY bread? Thank goodness. Now we can all feel a little less guilty after eating five loaves before our food arrives at dinner because these types of bread are actually good for you! Keep reading to find the best types of healthy bread and how to go about choosing one.

1. Ezekiel Bread

Ezekiel bread is unique on its own because it’s made without added sugar and from sprouted whole grains. This occurs when the grains sprout from exposure to heat and moisture. The sprouting process actually increases the amount and bio-availability of vitamins and minerals. In fact, sprouting wheat may lead to significant increases in soluble fiber, folate, vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene. This makes Ezekiel bread one heck of a nutritional source. Companies that make bread can sprout their grains in two different ways: dry or wet.

Dry sprouting process: When dry sprouting, you sprout the grain and then immediately dry it to lock in the nutrients at their peak. Then the sprouted grains can be stored until it is cooked or made into bread.

Wet sprouting process: During the wet sprouting process, the sprouts are mashed into a wet paste to make bread and items like tortillas.

Ezekiel bread contains four types of grains and two types of legumes. The grains consist of wheat, millet, barley and spelt, while the legumes include soybeans and lentils. With the sprouting process, Ezekiel bread is a healthy loaf of bread that can't be ignored.

Nutritional Breakdown

Per serving (1 slice) of Ezekiel Bread:

  • 80 calories
  • 15g carbs
  • 0 sugar
  • 4g protein
  • 3g fiber
  • 0g fat

2. Sprouted Whole Grain

Whole grain bread is packed with nutrients, fiber, and healthy plant compounds found naturally in grain. The term "whole grains" can mean it has one of many types of healthy grains included in the product, so be sure to check the labels to find out which grains are actually included. When the whole grains are sprouted, they include more nutrients, as previously stated. However, studies show that sprouting grains also increases antioxidants, while simultaneously decreasing anti-nutrients. Anti-nutrients are compounds that bind to minerals like iron and block their absorption.

Nutritional Breakdown

Per serving (1 slice) of sprouted whole grain bread:

  • 60 calories
  • 12g carbs
  • 0g sugar
  • 3g protein
  • fiber
  • 0.5g fat

3. Flaxseed Bread

Made primarily from whole-grain flours and flax seeds, flaxseed bread is one of the healthiest breads you can eat. Flax seeds are highly nutritious and offer a number of health benefits. Particularly, they are an excellent source of alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid found in plant foods. This is an incredibly resourceful way for vegans to get their omega-3 nutrients since fish oil and oily fish are typically the best supplement and animal source of the fatty acid. Also, flax seeds boast compounds called lignans which act as antioxidants in your body and can help protect against certain cancers!

Nutritional Breakdown

Per serving (2 slices) of flaxseed bread:

  • 100 calories
  • 19g carbs
  • 1g sugar
  • 6g protein
  • 4g fiber
  • 1g fat

4. Whole Grain/Multigrain Bread

With a ton of nutrients, fiber, and healthy plant compounds that are naturally found in the grain, whole grain foods are a great choice. The term "whole grains" can actually mean it has one of many types of healthy grains included in the product. Multigrain bread means exactly what you'd think it means. This type of bread contains a variety of different types of grains.

Nutritional Breakdown

Per one serving (1 slice) of whole grain bread:

  • 60 calories
  • 12g carbs
  • 0g sugar
  • 3g protein
  • 3g fiber
  • 0.5g fat

Per one serving (1 slice) of multigrain bread:

  • 100 calories
  • 18g carbs
  • 3g sugar
  • 5g protein
  • 1.7g fiber
  • 1.1g fat

5. Sourdough

This is one of the more labor-intensive types of bread to make. Sourdough is made through a fermentation process which relies on naturally occurring yeast and bacteria to make the bread rise. The process of fermentation helps reduce the number of phytates that bind to certain minerals and impair their absorption. The fermentation process creates probiotics which help you digest it much easier. Sourdough can be made with both whole-wheat and white flours, but whole-wheat sourdough has more nutrients. Also, sourdough is commonly used in restaurants so HOLLA!!

Nutritional Breakdown

Per serving (1 slice) of sourdough bread:

  • 140 calories
  • 26g carbs
  • 1g sugar
  • 5g protein
  • 3g fiber
  • 0g fat

6. 100% Whole Wheat

Yes, there is a difference between whole wheat and whole grain bread. According to the Whole Grain Council, (yes, that's a thing) whole wheat is a type of whole grain. Basically, all whole wheat is whole grain, but whole grain is not whole wheat. Whew, try saying that five times fast. Whole wheat bread is high in fiber because it keeps the entire grain intact, including the germ, endosperm, and bran.

Warning! A lot of manufacturers label their product as "whole wheat" so they appear healthier. When looking for either whole wheat or whole grain products, check the ingredients to make sure there aren't any additional ingredients and that it is 100% whole wheat or whole grain. You can thank me later.

Nutritional Breakdown

Per serving (1 slice) of 100% whole wheat bread:

  • 100 calories
  • 19g carbs
  • 3g sugar
  • 4g protein
  • 4g fiber
  • 0.5g fat

7. Rye Bread

Not to be confused with wheat bread, rye bread is much darker and usually denser than the former. Rye bread used to only be made from rye flour, however, modern times have incorporated wheat flour in the process as well. Rye bread also usually has caraway seeds baked into it. Another big difference between rye bread and wheat bread is that rye bread is considered to be more nutritious. In fact, studies have shown that rye bread can have less of an impact on blood sugar than wheat bread due to the fact that it releases significantly less insulin. Too much insulin can lead to obesity and type 2 diabetes. Rye bread's ability to have less insulin release is linked to its high soluble fiber content.

Nutritional Breakdown

Per one serving (1 slice) of rye bread:

  • 90 calories
  • 16g carbs
  • 1g sugar
  • 3g protein
  • 3g fiber
  • 1g fat

8. Oat Bread

Oats are the G.O.A.T. of good carbs. I'm not talking about the animal, I mean it in the trendy sense of "greatest of all time". They make you feel fuller for longer because they are slow-digesting. Oats have a high source of cholesterol-lowering fiber. This fiber has also been shown to reduce certain cancers, such as colon cancer, diabetes, digestive problems, and even heart disease. Bonus: oat breads are also richer in protein than wheat breads.

Nutritional Breakdown

Per one serving (1 slice) of oat bread:

  • 120 calories
  • 22g carbs
  • 3g sugar
  • 4g protein
  • 4g fiber
  • 1.5g fat

9. Gluten-Free Bread

It's time to say bye-bye to wheat, barley, and rye. To make gluten-free bread, four other starches are used in their place—cornstarch, rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato flour. If you're trying to cut down your gluten intake, either for health reasons or allergies, gluten-free bread is the way to start. Unfortunately, it's more expensive than other breads. Which, in my opinion, doesn't make sense because why should people with gluten allergies have to pay more for their bread? That's another discussion. I just love bread and want everyone to have bread equality.

Nutritional Breakdown

Per one serving (1 slice) of gluten-free bread:

  • 80 calories
  • 13g carbs
  • 1g sugar
  • 1g protein
  • 5g fiber
  • 5g fat

10. Brown Rice Bread

If you're vegan AND gluten-free, this is the best option for you! Brown rice bread still provides the benefits of fiber, proteins, thiamine, calcium, magnesium and even potassium. It's made with natural rice and without dairy and eggs.

Nutritional Breakdown

Per one serving (1 slice) of brown rice bread:

  • 110 calories
  • 19g carbs
  • 1g sugar
  • 2g protein
  • 2g fiber
  • 3.4g fat

How To Choose Your Healthy Bread

Now that you're about to go grocery shopping for some healthy bread to munch on, here are some things you need to look out for while selecting your next loaf of bread. Check your brands to see if they have:

  • 100% whole grain OR sprouted grains listed first
  • No more than 5 grams of fiber per slice
  • No more than 6 grams of protein per slice
  • No added sweeteners

PLEASE note that while the breads on this list are healthier than other varieties, bread is generally not as nutritious as other whole foods. Now, let's get this healthy bread!

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